Here is a new tool for family law clients. It is an interesting flow chart that explains the various processes for resolution of family law issues.

Unfortunately, it gives very little space to Collaborative Practice  and ignores the interdisciplinary nature of the process but it details the court process well.

I think you’ll enjoy it!

Source   http://www.bestmastersincounseling.com/children-and-divorce/

 

A Parents’ Guide to Children and Divorce

Divorce is one of the most traumatic experiences a person can go through, whether they’re a spouse or a child of divorcing parents. Let’s look at some of the facts behind divorce and its effects on children, including how parents can help ensure their

It is no secret to anyone involved in the legal industry that family court is an expensive method to resolve the issues arising from separation. Frankly, it can hemorrhage a family financially. 

One way to avoid huge court costs is to engage in the negotiation of a separation agreement.  This enables you to keep your

 “We don’t agree on much, but we want to protect the kids”

Does this sound familiar?  Parental conflict in a family may be high whether you’re separating, living separate and apart under the same roof, or working through conflict as a married couple.  And it comes as no surprise to you that the emotional health

“Oh yeah, I need to make that appointment.”  I hear this so frequently from successful people who generally have made sound financial choices.  Let’s face it – it’s difficult to conjure up a sense of urgency about a future event – death – one that we expect is half a lifetime or decades away.  Why

people wonder... what are my options for divorce?

Most separations and divorces are stressful and painful. You can choose to make it better or worse by the process you choose to use. The following are your choices. 

Collaborative Practice

Collaborative Practice is a future-focused, efficient, cost-effective, creative, problem-solving process. It is not about fighting or finding blame. With the help

Does child support end when a child reach age 18 years? Our lawyer Lynn Kirwin answers this question in detail. 

The courts have recognized that financial dependency does not end upon a child turning 18.  Under the Divorce act and the Family Law Act there is no upper age limit under which support automatically terminates.